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The End of Maximum Linux

Friday February 16, 2001 02:59pm PST
At midnight last night, Imagine Media announced that it was closing the doors on Maximum Linux Magazine. Emmett Plant talks to some of their staff to find out the story.
I got a call this afternoon from Mae Ling Mak, who writes a regular column for Maximum Linux magazine. She told me that all of the offices for Maximum Linux were being closed, and that the issue that's on the stands right now is the last issue of Maximum Linux.

This is sad in one way, inevitable in another. Imagine Media, who also publishes MaximumPC and The Official Sega Dreamcast Magazine, created Maximum Linux to jump on the Linux bandwagon. While being a colorful and interesting magazine, many people in the Linux community shunned the magazine for not being technical enough to serve their needs.


I asked Mae Ling how she felt about the closing.

Mae Ling: Well, since I announced that I quit the other day, I'm kind of disappointed that the issues that were going to come out this year without me in them, I was interested to see the reaction from the readers.


I also got on the phone with Kelli Sheppard, Maximum Linux's Online Editor.

Binary Freedom: What happened?

Kelli: Basically, they shut down six out of the twelve magazines here. Maximum Linux was doing fine, it wasn't a problem with the magazine at all, I believe it was turning a profit. Instead, they're taking the money from the magazines they pulled and putting it into the others to grow those properties. Basically, they're doing what's good for Imagine.

Binary Freedom: How do you feel about this?

Kelli: Terrible. Maximum Linux was more than a job, we worked hard, and we loved what we did. It's more than losing a job, it's losing a part of us. We're all great friends, and now that's gone.

The reason I feel so bad it probably my own fault. I made Maximum Linux more than it should be, I got too attached ot it and made it part of my life, it's hard to lose something you've worked so hard for, something you're passionate about.

Binary Freedom: What will you do after this?

Kelli: I don't know. We just found out, I found out midnight last night. We're still spinning. Life after Imagine, it's hard to say. It's hard to imagine a cooler or more fun job than what we had here. Finding something that comes close to that is going to be really hard.

Binary Freedom: Does this decision have anything to do with Linux technology?

Kelli: We work for a publishing company, but we do a technology magazine. So, when technology takes a dump with the stocks and whatnot, it's going to affect us, as well, it's not just tech businesses.


While Imagine Media has closed the doors on Maximum Linux, the Linux media (which has typically been primarily web-based) charges on. Magazines like Linux Magazine, Linux Journal and Embedded Linux Journal continue to keep Linux on the magazine racks at bookstores all over North America.

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Copyright © 2004, The Binary Freedom Project, LLC.